“Giant cyborgs and miniature humanoids: male nudes in South Korean art” (Art Radar)

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As a compliment to my article, “Supplementary Skins”, my most recent post for Art Radar Asia, “Giant cyborgs and miniature humanoids: male nudes in South Korean art” reviews work by Lee Yongbaek, Choi Xooang, Dongwook Lee, Hyungkoo Lee, and Kim Joon. See an excerpt below.

Korea is the male make-up capital of the world and cosmetic surgery for men is becoming increasingly prevalent. For business or for pleasure, Korean men are willing to augment their bodies through means beyond pumping iron and following a stringent diet. This sea change in attitude towards acceptable masculinity has not escaped national or international critical comment: Sun Jung’s book Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yosama, Rain, Oldboy, K-Pop Idols digs deeper into changing Korean masculinity, as does Stephen J. Epstein and Rachael M. Yoo’s article “Multiple Exposures: Korean Bodies and the Transnational Imagination.”

Posted: August 30th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Art Review, Body | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on “Giant cyborgs and miniature humanoids: male nudes in South Korean art” (Art Radar)

Sunday Morning Coffee [Biggby’s with Bob]

Ariana Russell’s Sail via DesignBoom

DesignBoom says, “American artist Ariana Russell responds to the unique components of her skin to draw painless, temporary, and ephemeral designs on her body, the designs visible just long enough to photograph the results. Russell has a skin condition called dermatographia…” Read more of the DesignBoom article here.

The image above is an oddly appropriate transitional image from today to tomorrow. Today is the last day of my vacation, I move from bright blue lakes and warm wind back to the chilly bustle of Chicago. I’m cleaning out my email at Lansing, Michigan based Biggby Coffee with lukewarm decaf. Our vacation was wonderful but I’m looking forward to getting back to SAIC and some writing projects. Ta-ta, summer! Enjoy the links below!

Edward Hopper in 3-D via DesignBoom.

A human harp via DesignBoom. This reminds me a bit of Miru Kim’s Naked City Spleen.

A stunning reaction to devastation via DesignBoom.

Gwangju Design Biennale opens on September 6. Read a quick intro via e-flux.

What’s coming up at Doosan Gallery in New York and Seoul.

Next time I’m in Seoul I really need to visit this space.

Posted: August 25th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Body, Sunday Morning Coffee | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Sunday Morning Coffee [Biggby’s with Bob]

Sunday Morning Coffee [North Korea]

From Jean H. Lee’s Instagram Feed

There are a couple of photographers I follow on Instagram that feature images of North Korea. One of the photographers, Jean H. Lee, was interviewed back in May.  Her Instagram handle is newsjean (David Guttenfelder’s handle dguttenfelder is the other; I recommend following both).  When asked about what would surprise the outside world about North Korea she says, “When I show my photos and videos of daily life in North Korea, or share anecdotes about what it’s like to live and work with North Koreans, people are most surprised by how “human” North Koreans seem because the picture we usually get is so orchestrated. But like the rest of us, they laugh, they cry, they joke, they fight. They love to tell jokes, they love to dance, they love to sing.”

On another noteThe Real DMZ Project opened July 27, the sixtieth anniversary of the cease-fire.  According to the project’s website, “The Real DMZ Project is a contemporary art project based on researches of the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone) and the border district. It began in 2012 and will be proceeded as a long term project with interdisciplinary researches and practices. This year, it aims to elaborate on geopolitical meanings of the border region of DMZ in Cheorwon through the frames of art, humanity, sociology, and science with ‘borderline’ as the keyword. Moreover, the project will seek to provide a sustainable platform where the studies of the DMZ conducted in diverse fields can be shared.” For more information visit the review on e-flux where I became aware of the project and The Real DMX Project website.

The conference I attended in Macau had film screening along with the panels. They featured two films about North Korea, each representing a different approach to the situation there: Unfortunate Brothers: Korea’s Reunification Dilemma and Memory of Forgotten War. I only viewed the second but after talking to the director of the screenings I would recommend both of the films.

If you’d like to dig deeper into the visual politics of North Korea I recommend looking into Visual Politics and North Korea: Seeing is Believing by David Shim. It will be published by Routledge later this the fall.

On a lighter note, I prefer this to this.

After this post goes live I’ll have just enjoyed a scone and coffee sitting next to Lake Michigan at sunrise with my parents and husband. A much needed pause from this (wonderful) and crazy summer. If you’d like to follow along you can find me on Instagram. Enjoy the last few days of summer.

Posted: August 18th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Art Review, Sunday Morning Coffee | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Sunday Morning Coffee [North Korea]

Big Busts for Winter

via DesignBoom

José Lerma and Héctor Madera‘s bright and oversized busts are currently at Saatchi Gallery in London but will move to the MCA in Chicago this December. Also check out some of Madera’s portraits on his website.

Posted: August 16th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Art Review, Visual and Critical Studies | Tags: , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Big Busts for Winter

Korean (Artist Made) Craniums

Dongwook Lee’s Vitamin from 2003 via Doosan Gallery

From the press release of his solo exhibition Love Me Sweet at Arario Gallery, “As figure who represents the Korean new wave sculptors early in the new millennium, Lee has contrasted perfect beauty to the violent, uncanny situations that lurk beneath through elaborate and realistic sculptures made of a material called Sculpie. The composition of his works, perfectly modeled and exposed under precise containment, reflect Lee’s tendency to push himself to the very boundaries of controllability.” via Art Forum

Mioon’s Lead Me to Your Door from 2011 via Neolook

Mioon is a collaborative between Min Kim and Moon Choi. I first saw their work in the Korean Eye Catalogue which states of the artists, “In their reading of today’s cultural landscape they reveal the fictional and ideological mechanisms that pervade underneath the surface of things in various forms.”

Hyungkoo Lee’s Face Trace 003 from 2012 via AKIVE

Part of Gallery Skape’s press release for Face Trace, “The artist captures his own various facial expressions and intentionally fragments into several parts. By reassembling them according to the studies of physiognomy, he composes totally different figures. Face Trace is created by overlapping skull structures of several human races and different parts of artist’s multiple facial expressions. This process follows the method of facial reconstruction used in forensic science.” via Art Agenda

Posted: August 14th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Art Review, Body | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Korean (Artist Made) Craniums

Sunday Morning Coffee [Things I’ve been meaning to read/write about]

Image of Young Jean Lee’s Untitled Feminist Show (source)

Article on Art Radar: nudity to challenge state corruption in China, an interview with Kimsooja (who represents South Korea in the Venice Biennale this year), an interview with Afghanistan’s first female street artist,  and finally, I was thrilled to see an article on Young Sun Han! Hang grew up outside of Chicago (and has since lived all over the world). I had the pleasure of meeting him last year. Some of his work addresses his North Korean heritage.

Last spring I had the privilege of seeing Young Jean Lee’s Untitled Feminist Show at the MCA in Chicago. The experience was shocking, liberating, energizing, and hands down the most intelligent and provoking work I’ve seen on a stage. I also saw a talk with Lee before the performance and met her briefly afterwards, she was humble, intelligent, and gracious. This week I was thrilled to see a piece about her “We’re Gonna Die” on the New York Times. Here’s a clip about it on NYT (I love that the next clip is about Avenue Q) and Lee’s Viemo stream.

I always enjoy immersive art via DesignBoom.

Have you heard of the Museum of Old and New Art in Tasmania? The name of the museum doesn’t revel the content of the collection: sex and death. Here’s an article about it from the New Yorker.

Doosan Gallery in Seoul just opened the exhibition The Next Generation. Someone go take a peak for me!

Five films for those who are involved in the arts via Art Radar. I show Un chien Andalou to my students the second day of class!

Hazel Dooney on the gallery system.

Some portraits on DesignBoom: Kim Jong Il framed in pink,  colorful x-rays, and lego heads.

A little bit of nepotism, my sister just moved to England and started a new blog to document the experience with her stunning photography and marvelous writing. She used to write here.

Posted: August 11th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Art Review, Body, Sunday Morning Coffee, Visual and Critical Studies | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Sunday Morning Coffee [Things I’ve been meaning to read/write about]