Sunday Morning Coffee

Still from Sojung Jun’s (전소정) film Last Pleasure (마지막 기쁨) at Doosan Gallery starting Sept. 4

An important tribute to an inspiring, generous, and vivacious person.  I interviewed Crystal a few years ago to help spread the word about China Residencies. Now an incredibly successful program, China Residencies is one small part of the vast legacy Crystal left this world.  

Ted Lawson creates drawings of his body with his own blood as medium via an IV (via DesignBoom). His artwork includes many different bodies made of various media such as blood, resin, steel, and found objects. Aspects of Lawson’s work are reminiscent of Choi Xooang’s work.

SAIC’s Conversations at the Edge schedule for fall 2014 was just released. Cao Fei will give a talk on October 23. Among many things, Fei is especially well known for the world she created on Second Life. Here’s a tour of it via Art Forum. I’d love to get to Chicago to hear that talk!

An important diagram for people from the United States to keep in mind. We have so much further to go.

“Why I’m Leaving Gagosian” via Art Market Monitor. In regard to the gallery’s impact on the global art market, the author of the article, Kenny Schachter, says, “To put the problem in the simplest terms, the interests of the collectors continue to be sidelined in the way the firm operates and thinks about making money. Gagosian is one of the world’s largest and most important galleries and it is too integral to the global art market to continue to act this way.”  

A Journal of the Plague Year. Continental Fear. Islands, ghosts, rebels opened at Arko Art Center in Seoul yesterday. I saw this exhibition last year in Hong Kong at Para Site and highly recommend it. The exhibition features a plethora of artists, some are internationally known like Ai Weiwei. The exhibition, “… departs from and remains strongly connected to an exploration of the events that affected Hong Kong in the spring of 2003: the most significant airborne epidemic in recent years, the SARS crisis, coupled with the tragic death of pop figure and pan-Asian icon Leslie Cheung” (e-flux).

Posted: August 31st, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Art Review, Body, Sunday Morning Coffee | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Fake Plastic Trees by Choi Xooang

I wrote an article about Choi Xooang for Art Radar Asia a few months ago. He’s been mentioned numerous times in the past on this blog as well. He recently closed the exhibition Fake Plastic Trees. Graywall Art Advisory and Collaboration Projects shared some of the images with me to post here. I reference some of the images in the article mentioned above: “His sculpture Colonization, at just over one hundred centimeters tall, is roughly the height of a large toddler, but with a dog head and a human male body. Despite its miniature size the figure is striking: he seems to be in motion and alert but harnessed by his own skin. The details of the sculpture convey an eerie, non-human, vagabond-like figure fabricated with multiple unmatched parts: the dog head, a mismatched hand, underwear, and laced boots. The most striking of these details is the thick brown stitching that crawls up the dog-headed boy’s back. The chest skin is worn like a vest. Choi disallows the viewer from knowing what truly lies beneath this cobbled figure’s outer layer.”

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Posted: October 18th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Art Review, Body | Tags: , | 1 Comment »

“Giant cyborgs and miniature humanoids: male nudes in South Korean art” (Art Radar)

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As a compliment to my article, “Supplementary Skins”, my most recent post for Art Radar Asia, “Giant cyborgs and miniature humanoids: male nudes in South Korean art” reviews work by Lee Yongbaek, Choi Xooang, Dongwook Lee, Hyungkoo Lee, and Kim Joon. See an excerpt below.

Korea is the male make-up capital of the world and cosmetic surgery for men is becoming increasingly prevalent. For business or for pleasure, Korean men are willing to augment their bodies through means beyond pumping iron and following a stringent diet. This sea change in attitude towards acceptable masculinity has not escaped national or international critical comment: Sun Jung’s book Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yosama, Rain, Oldboy, K-Pop Idols digs deeper into changing Korean masculinity, as does Stephen J. Epstein and Rachael M. Yoo’s article “Multiple Exposures: Korean Bodies and the Transnational Imagination.”

Posted: August 30th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Art Review, Body | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on “Giant cyborgs and miniature humanoids: male nudes in South Korean art” (Art Radar)

Who is Alice?

Venice Biennale is not only an opportunity for the featured artists but also a chance for other artists to flood the neighboring art spaces in the City of Bridges. In a designated collateral event, Who is Alice? is an exhibition at Spazio Lightbox curated by Chuyoung Lee featuring 16 artists from South Korea: U-Ram Choe, Young Geun Park, Hong Chun Park, Hein Kuh Oh, Osang Gwon, Yeon Doo Jung, Myung Keun Koh, Dongwook Lee, Xooang Choi, Jung Wook Kim, Doo-jin Kim, Hyungkoo Lee, Beom Kim, Haegue Yang, and Myoung Ho Lee. You have seen Xooang Choi (or Choi Xooang) and Hyungkoo Lee on this blog before. Interestingly, Lee was part of a group that represented South Korea in the Korean Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2007.

Doo-Jin Kim, The Youth of Bacchus, 2010-2011 via National Museum of Contemporary Art Korea

Who is Alice? is acts as a themed survey of some of the contemporary art made by artists from South Korea the last few years. The artworks selected for the exhibition are from the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art Korea‘s permanent collection. They give an overview of the rooms on their website and where you can also see some images of the work . In the statement the curator says that Who is Alice? “will greet you with a hand coyly outstretched and, before you know it, will have whisked you away into its phantasmagoric depth of contemporary Korean art.” The exhibition has received ample international coverage on online sources such as e-flux and Art in Asia.

Posted: June 17th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Art Review | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Who is Alice?